Give your diorama a title

Every great work of art has a title. Whether it’s Michelangelo’s David or Van Gogh’s Starry Night, titling artwork has been a tradition for countless generations of artists. 

The first function of a title is to provide a convenient way of referring to a work of art. It’s much easier to say “I really like Starry Night” than “I really like that painting by Van Gogh with the blue night sky and stars and interesting brush work.” There’s also a second very important function served by a title which I’ll get to in a moment.

Some modern artists eschew titles and instead opt to use the curious descriptor Untitled for their works. At first glance this seems like laziness, but it’s actually worse than that. The absence of a proper title is another element of the subversiveness which defines modern art. As I’ve mentioned before, modern art is an attack on traditional art and a vehicle for cultural marxism. It is  political and social critique disguised as art, and its main purpose is to destabilize the core beliefs and values of Western civilization. So when a pop art painter doesn’t title his work, he does it for the same reason that he flouts all other artistic traditions.

Looking to the world of literature, writers no doubt enjoy coming up with the perfect title for their new book. After all, words are their specialty. They’d probably scoff at pop artists who call their works Untitled and simply write them off as illiterate.

Many diorama artists don’t attach a title to their work until they enter it in a contest or post a photo of it online. And some don’t use titles at all. This is most likely due to modesty: they don’t consider their diorama to be a work of art. They say it’s just a project they did over a few weekends and therefore doesn’t need a title. (By the way, if you don’t think a diorama is a work of art, read this post.)

Regardless of whether or not you think titling your diorama is immodest, here’s the second reason to title it: a title aids communication. You want your diorama to say something to your audience, and a title helps with that process. It gives the viewer extra information apart from what your diorama conveys visually. By adding written words to the imagery, it clarifies ambiguities and provides focus. It can even help tell the story.

Drug Runners is a good example of how a title can aid communication. Without the title, this diorama looks like a gunfight between two scruffy looking guys in a speedboat and what appear to be airborne infantry. Viewers may have trouble figuring out what’s going on. But add the title and everything becomes clear. The guys in the boat are running drugs and the infantry are trying to stop them. 

Titles can be long or short, and clear or cryptic. I prefer them to be short and clear. An overly long title suggests that your diorama is visually confusing and you need lots of language to explain it. And a cryptic title may be clever but doesn’t communicate as well.

Start thinking about a title for your new diorama even before you start building. It will help you focus on what you want to say to your audience, and you’ll end up with a better result in the end. 

If you like to build dioramas and want to learn more about how to optimize the visual impact of your work, you might like my new book, Diorama Design. It’s available in both ebook and print formats at Amazon.

-Ivar

Scaling things down with GEO Craper

Everyone loves big models. Much like the biggest sculpture in an art gallery, the sheer size of a 1:24 aircraft or a 1:16 tank immediately commands our attention. But sometimes it pays to go small, especially for the diorama artist. 

Which brings us to the diminutive GEO Craper series of urban terrain modules offered by Nihon Takujo Kaihatsu . . . in a very modest 1:2500 scale. Each interconnecting module measures 6cm square and can be combined with other modules in a variety of ways to create unique cityscapes. The modules come pre-painted and ready to go out of the box. 

GEO Craper product categories include Basic Units (dense clusters of urban buildings), Landmark Units (famous Japanese structures such as Edo Castle and Tokyo Tower), and Extension Units (highways, industrial complexes, etc.). 

You may be wondering what use a 1:2500 cityscape would be when it’s so far removed from common scales like 1:72, 1:48, etc. There are in fact several ways these modules could make their way into a diorama. 

One application would be for fans of Japanese cinema and television who want to put their Godzilla or Ultraman figure in an urban environment. Everyone knows Godzilla is huge, so enough said. Ultraman fans know that this superhero has the ability to change size at will. This enables him to square off against any size of opponent he is likely to meet. So a medium size Ultraman figure will look just right towering over a GEO Craper cityscape. You could also pair him up with whichever monster of the week suits your taste and create a battle scene. 

Another application would be a forced perspective scene with an aircraft in a larger scale flying over the GEO Craper cityscape. 

These are just a few examples but you get the idea. GEO Craper products are available through HobbyLink Japan. 

If you like to build dioramas and want to learn more about how to optimize the visual impact of your work, you might like my new book, Diorama Design. It’s available in both ebook and print formats at Amazon.

-Ivar