Category Archives: Products

Death Star Attack Diorama from Bandai

Finally, a diorama kit of the climactic trench run scene from Star Wars IV: A New Hope. Modellers have been scratchbuilding dioramas of this scene for years, using Death Star tiles (resin castings depicting segments of the Death Star surface) from garage kit producers. But this is the first mass produced injection kit of the subject to come to market. Bandai’s timing is quite leisurely: it’s been 41 years since the release of the groundbreaking film that started the famous sci-fi franchise. 

To keep things to a manageable size, Bandai has rendered this kit in 1:144 scale. There have been several releases of 1:144 Star Wars vehicles in the last year or two, and if you were wondering why anyone would need a 1:144 X-Wing when it’s already quite compact in 1:72 scale, here’s the answer. 

The attack on the Death Star was the pièce de résistance of John Dykstra’s revolutionary special effects sequences which helped make A New Hope a cinematic milestone. This scene showcased the capabilities of the new Dykstraflex computer controlled technology to its fullest, making a lasting impression on sci-fi fans everywhere. So brilliant was the trench run scene that it’s been copied a number of times, both within the Star Wars franchise as well as in other films. 

Since this kit is coming from Bandai, modellers can rest assured that it will meet the highest standards in terms of accuracy and fit. It will likely be engineered to go together quickly and easily, requiring no advanced modelling skills. 

The design is well thought out, with a laser cannon tower balancing the X-Wing on the opposite end. The diorama will be small enough to fit on just about any bookshelf. 

The only shortcoming of the kit, based on the initial publicity photos, is the visually clumsy support post for the X-Wing. Supporting a flying vehicle with a plastic post puts a dent in the overall realism of the scene. With a few modifications, the vehicles could be hung from wires for a cleaner look. For Star Wars modellers who haven’t yet ventured into the world of dioramas, this kit is the perfect opportunity to make a go of it. 

If you like to build dioramas and want to learn more about how to optimize the visual impact of your work, you might like my new book, Diorama Design. It’s available in both ebook and print formats at Amazon.

-Ivar

Scaling things down with GEO Craper

Everyone loves big models. Much like the biggest sculpture in an art gallery, the sheer size of a 1:24 aircraft or a 1:16 tank immediately commands our attention. But sometimes it pays to go small, especially for the diorama artist. 

Which brings us to the diminutive GEO Craper series of urban terrain modules offered by Nihon Takujo Kaihatsu . . . in a very modest 1:2500 scale. Each interconnecting module measures 6cm square and can be combined with other modules in a variety of ways to create unique cityscapes. The modules come pre-painted and ready to go out of the box. 

GEO Craper product categories include Basic Units (dense clusters of urban buildings), Landmark Units (famous Japanese structures such as Edo Castle and Tokyo Tower), and Extension Units (highways, industrial complexes, etc.). 

You may be wondering what use a 1:2500 cityscape would be when it’s so far removed from common scales like 1:72, 1:48, etc. There are in fact several ways these modules could make their way into a diorama. 

One application would be for fans of Japanese cinema and television who want to put their Godzilla or Ultraman figure in an urban environment. Everyone knows Godzilla is huge, so enough said. Ultraman fans know that this superhero has the ability to change size at will. This enables him to square off against any size of opponent he is likely to meet. So a medium size Ultraman figure will look just right towering over a GEO Craper cityscape. You could also pair him up with whichever monster of the week suits your taste and create a battle scene. 

Another application would be a forced perspective scene with an aircraft in a larger scale flying over the GEO Craper cityscape. 

These are just a few examples but you get the idea. GEO Craper products are available through HobbyLink Japan. 

If you like to build dioramas and want to learn more about how to optimize the visual impact of your work, you might like my new book, Diorama Design. It’s available in both ebook and print formats at Amazon.

-Ivar

New 1:350 K’t’inga and a Klingon Battlecruiser retrospective

Star Trek fans will be delighted to hear that Round 2 has announced a 1:350 Klingon K’t’inga Battlecruiser kit, scheduled for September 2018 release.  The kit is based on the miniature which appeared in Star Trek: The Motion Picture and will no doubt conform to Round 2’s high standards of detail and accuracy.

Until now, Trek modellers interested in a 1:350 scale kit of the venerable Klingon ship have had to rely on expensive limited run resin kits. These “garage kits” tend to be relatively costly since independent producers cast the pieces by hand, which is a time consuming process. These producers also pay retail for the resin which goes into the kits, so raw material costs are high. The result is that garage kit prices are never competitive with mass produced injection molded kits. Moreover, the kits require substantially greater modelling skills, and a great deal of patience is often needed to correct surface imperfections in the parts if the quality of the resin is not up to par.

Pricing for a resin garage kit of the K’t’inga could easily run upwards of $USD 500, whereas Round 2 will be offering the kit through dealers at a suggested retail price of $USD 100. This is an incredible bargain. Moreover, the injection molding of the kit means that lighting can be incorporated quite easily (a separate lighting kit will be offered later). Full details of the release are available on Round 2’s website.

The K’t’inga is a fascinating design (as Spock would say), connecting an insectoid pod-shaped head to a delta wing body via a long tubular member. The angled down wingtips terminate in beefy warp nacelles, giving the ship a powerful, broad shouldered look. The K’t’inga’s impulse drive gives off a flickering red glow (the flicker being unique to Klingon technology) which further enhances the menacing look of the ship.

The battlecruiser from the original Star Trek series was designed by Matt Jefferies, who also designed the Enterprise. According to Wikipedia, “the D7-class battlecruiser was designed … to mimic the appearance of a manta ray,” and Jefferies wanted it to appear “threatening, even vicious.”

The K’t’inga which emerged in the Trek films many years later retained most of the original D7 design. The changes were largely cosmetic, consisting mainly of tweaking the geometry and adding surface detail to impart a better sense of scale.

The K’t’inga has made many a bold appearance in the Star Trek films. One of the most memorable was the opening sequence of Star Trek: The Motion Picture, which featured three of these magnificent ships facing off against V’ger. This sequence stands as one of the finest visual tributes ever made to a Trek vessel, showcasing the K’t’inga in its full splendour to the backdrop of a rousing martial soundtrack. Although the film was a critical failure, the producers got one thing right, which was giving plenty of screen time to the iconic vessels of Star Trek. 

Modellers will have no shortage of inspiration to create a diorama featuring the ship, although working in 1:350 scale will confine this pursuit to those with lots of space!

If you like to build dioramas and want to learn more about how to optimize the visual impact of your work, you might like my new book, Diorama Design. It’s available in both ebook and print formats at Amazon.

-Ivar

A deluxe diorama for Space: 1999 fans

Round 2 has released a 1:48 scale Nuclear Waste Area 2 Diorama Set which will delight fans of the 1970s TV show Space: 1999. Few sci-fi programs have generated such mixed feelings among viewers. On one hand, Brian Johnson’s special effects, taking direct inspiration from 2001: A Space Odyssey, were miles ahead of anything else on TV at the time. On the other hand, the stories lacked drama and failed to capture viewers’ attention, leading to the series being cancelled after two seasons.

Love it or hate it, Space: 1999 has stood the test of time. Its fan base is still going strong nearly half a century after the show’s cancellation. This has created demand for countless model kits and diecast replicas of the show’s wonderful hardware over the years. Which brings us to Round 2’s latest offering.

The Nuclear Waste Area 2 Diorama Set recalls “Breakaway,” the pilot episode of Space: 1999. In a last minute attempt to avert disaster, Eagle Transporters are dispatched to disperse nuclear waste canisters from the waste area before they can detonate. The attempt is unsuccessful and a massive explosion throws the moon out of earth’s orbit, setting the scene for two seasons of sci-fi adventures.

The kit includes the following:

  • 8x Lamp Posts with plug & play LED lights (requires 4 AA batteries – not included)
  • 2x Lamp Post Bases
  • 10x Figures in mix-and-match poses
  • 2x Moon buggies with cargo
  • 2x Nuclear Waste Control Cones
  • 2x Waste Containment Platforms
  • 8x Hexagonal Storage Boxes

These components can be used alone or in conjunction with Round 2’s 1:48 Eagle kit to create any number of scenes. All that’s missing is a lunar terrain base, which the resourceful diorama artist can tackle on his own. The really ambitious modeller could add a launch pad and crane to complete the scene. Round 2’s choice of 1:48 scale means that the diorama will have a very big footprint, especially if an Eagle is added.

The initial release of the kit also includes a 1:24 scale moon buggy. This is a curious addition given that it obviously won’t work in the same diorama as the other items. The upside is that the moon buggy could be a precursor to other 1:24 scale kits to come. The laser tanks from “The Infernal Machine” (Season 1, Episode 21) would be an excellent choice. Let’s keep our fingers crossed.

If you like to build dioramas and want to learn more about how to optimize the visual impact of your work, you might like my new book, Diorama Design. It’s available in both ebook and print formats at Amazon.

-Ivar

Diorama sheets from Hakoniwa-Giken

A few months ago we looked at a series of backdrops by Coastal Kits, which are designed to provide modellers with an easy way to simulate the look of an aircraft in flight. The photorealistic backdrops feature a blur effect to simulate motion. Of course, backdrops can be static as well. For modellers interested in creating a static scene, a new series of paper backgrounds from Hakoniwa-Giken might fit the bill. Measuring 90 by 60 centimetres, these photorealistic backdrops can be used to showcase aircraft, spacecraft, and even model trains.

The aircraft backdrops include cloud filled skies as well as complete hangar scenes. The sci-fi backdrops include moonscapes, planets and spacecraft hangars. They can be positioned flat behind your model or, for hangar scenes, folded 90 degrees to provide both a base and a backdrop.

For those who want to go a step further, these backdrops could be adapted to a shadowbox. This would provide more control over lighting and create a more finished presentation.

Hakoniwa-Giken’s website is grouped by model type (note that the sci-fi products are under the ship section). The manufacturer provides a complete list of specifications for each sheet and links to their eBay store. Their products are also available through HobbyLink Japan.

If you like to build dioramas and want to learn more about how to optimize the visual impact of your work, you might like my new book, Diorama Design. It’s available in both ebook and print formats at Amazon.

-Ivar

Ground Blur display bases from Coastal Kits

Coastal Kits has come up with a simple and effective way to create a diorama with the illusion of motion. By mounting your model aircraft above a Ground Blur display base, the streaked photo-quality backdrop creates the impression that the aircraft is flying at high speed. This is the same motion blur effect which would be achieved by a photographer panning with a flying aircraft while taking the picture.

The bases are a foam board/plastic/vinyl laminate construction and various backgrounds are available. Although Coastal Kits shows the bases in tabletop configuration on its website, you could mount the base on a wall just like a painting, provided you had a sufficiently strong support rod for the aircraft. Since there always seems to be a shortage of space when it comes to displaying dioramas, the wall mount option is an appealing alternative. Just don’t put it in a high traffic area where visitors run the risk of knocking their heads against your aircraft model! See the Coastal Kits website for more information.

If you like to build dioramas and want to learn more about how to incorporate the illusion of motion into your work, you might like my new book, Diorama Design. It’s available both ebook and print formats at Amazon.

-Ivar

Second Anniversary

The release of my new book, Diorama Design, marks the second anniversary of Creative Dioramas. It’s now available on Amazon in both ebook and print formats.

Diorama Design is a practical guide to design theory for modellers who like to build dioramas. I explain key design concepts and show you how to apply them, using actual dioramas as case studies. Diorama Design will teach you how to think like an artist and increase the visual impact of your dioramas.

If you’re a regular visitor to this blog, thanks for your continued interest. Feel free to browse the catalogue of previous posts in addition to whatever’s on the home page, and use the search box if you’re after a specific topic. Here’s looking towards Year Three!

-Ivar

Diorama Design is now available on Amazon

I’m pleased to announce that my new book, Diorama Design, is now available on Amazon in both ebook and print formats.

Diorama Design is a practical guide to design theory for modellers who like to build dioramas. I explain key design concepts and show you how to apply them, using actual dioramas as case studies. Diorama Design will teach you how to think like an artist and increase the visual impact of your dioramas. Fully illustrated with colour photographs.

-Ivar

Charming minimalist dioramas from Platz

The Miniature Animal series from Platz puts a unique spin on the diorama. These tiny, carefully composed vignettes of domestic cats at play have a unique look, owing to the tall base and single background wall framing the main subject.

What makes these dioramas so refreshing is their very zen-like design. Like a Haiku poem, each scene is stripped to its bare essentials. Although obviously aimed at animal lovers, these products are an excellent case study in design for all diorama artists. Too often, dioramas are crammed to the brim with enough bric-a-brac to fill a small attic. The spare composition of the Miniature Animal series shows what can be achieved with a few elements precisely arranged for optimal aesthetic effect. Truly an example of “less is more.”

Most pre-assembled dioramas come with three walls, in an attempt to create a panoramic background. This type of design is visually clumsy due to the sharp 90° creases where the side walls meet the back wall. Platz has solved this problem by eliminating the side walls altogether. The single back wall is spare and elegant. It works remarkably well.

The Miniature Animal series is available through HobbyLink Japan at https://hlj.com/.

-Ivar

Announcing my upcoming book on dioramas

I’m currently putting the finishing touches on a new book. The focus of this book will be optimizing the visual impact of your dioramas. Whether you’ve built a few dioramas or are just starting out, this book will show you how to think like an artist and take your dioramas to the next level.

If you’re a regular reader of this blog, you may be wondering if the book is simply going to catalogue the posts I’ve written here. I can assure you that the content is all new and hasn’t been covered on this blog. I’ll also be including lots of photos which haven’t been posted before.

The book will be about 75 pages in length and will be available through Amazon. It will be illustrated in full colour. Stay tuned!

-Ivar