Tag Archives: Bandai

Death Star II and Star Destroyer mini kit set

Bandai’s latest Star Wars release is a pair of palm-sized mini kits which offer endless diorama possibilities. The second Death Star, even more menacing than the first, is scaled down to 1:2,700,000. The Empire’s might in the palm of your hand! Accompanied by a Star Destroyer in 1:14,500 scale.

Star Wars Wikia tells us the following: “Upon completion, the Death Star II would have been an immense battle station 200 kilometers in diameter that featured 560 internal levels which could house 2,471,647 passengers and crew.” To quote Darth Vader, “Impressive.”

I’m hoping that the Death Star II is in fact a kit with a good number of parts rather than a one-piece casting. This would make lighting it much easier. We’re so accustomed to seeing the Death Star lit up with thousands of internal lights, that an unlit version might come across as rather lifeless. Even adding a few dozen lights to the model would make a big difference. 

The ideal design for a kit of this type would be a thin outer shell which can be easily drilled to accommodate fiber optics. The same is true for the Star Destroyer. The challenge in both cases will be to find enough room for all the electronics.  

Diorama possibilities range from a simple scene of the Death Star II in space to a full blown recreation of the Battle of Endor. And because these are mini kits, you won’t need your entire living room to display the finished piece!

If you like to build dioramas and want to learn more about how to optimize the visual impact of your work, you might like my new book, Diorama Design. It’s available in both ebook and print formats at Amazon.

-Ivar

Death Star Attack Diorama from Bandai

Finally, a diorama kit of the climactic trench run scene from Star Wars IV: A New Hope. Modellers have been scratchbuilding dioramas of this scene for years, using Death Star tiles (resin castings depicting segments of the Death Star surface) from garage kit producers. But this is the first mass produced injection kit of the subject to come to market. Bandai’s timing is quite leisurely: it’s been 41 years since the release of the groundbreaking film that started the famous sci-fi franchise. 

To keep things to a manageable size, Bandai has rendered this kit in 1:144 scale. There have been several releases of 1:144 Star Wars vehicles in the last year or two, and if you were wondering why anyone would need a 1:144 X-Wing when it’s already quite compact in 1:72 scale, here’s the answer. 

The attack on the Death Star was the pièce de résistance of John Dykstra’s revolutionary special effects sequences which helped make A New Hope a cinematic milestone. This scene showcased the capabilities of the new Dykstraflex computer controlled technology to its fullest, making a lasting impression on sci-fi fans everywhere. So brilliant was the trench run scene that it’s been copied a number of times, both within the Star Wars franchise as well as in other films. 

Since this kit is coming from Bandai, modellers can rest assured that it will meet the highest standards in terms of accuracy and fit. It will likely be engineered to go together quickly and easily, requiring no advanced modelling skills. 

The design is well thought out, with a laser cannon tower balancing the X-Wing on the opposite end. The diorama will be small enough to fit on just about any bookshelf. 

The only shortcoming of the kit, based on the initial publicity photos, is the visually clumsy support post for the X-Wing. Supporting a flying vehicle with a plastic post puts a dent in the overall realism of the scene. With a few modifications, the vehicles could be hung from wires for a cleaner look. For Star Wars modellers who haven’t yet ventured into the world of dioramas, this kit is the perfect opportunity to make a go of it. 

If you like to build dioramas and want to learn more about how to optimize the visual impact of your work, you might like my new book, Diorama Design. It’s available in both ebook and print formats at Amazon.

-Ivar

Thunderbird 2 and the “kits versus toys” conundrum

There is usually a clear dividing line between plastic kit manufacturers (like Tamiya) and toy producers (like Hasbro). As far as I know, Tamiya has never produced a toy and Hasbro has never produced a scale model kit.

But some companies make both kits and toys. Bandai, Aoshima and Takara Tomy fall into this category. The quality of kits produced by these firms tends to be less consistent than you’d find with a dedicated kit manufacturer. This isn’t surprising given that their primary target market is children.

It goes without saying that five-year olds have a vastly different set of criteria than adults do when it comes to hobbies. Some five-year olds like to put their prized possessions in the sandbox. Others like to chew on them. I’ve yet to see any adult modellers taking part in either of these activities (if you know an adult fitting this description, please take them to a psychiatrist immediately).

Takara Tomy recently introduced both a large toy of Thunderbird 2 from the new Thunderbirds Are Go TV series, as well as a “Real Kit” of the same subject in 1:144 scale. The former product is aimed squarely at five-year olds. It features opening sections, moving parts, a detachable pod with Thunderbird 4, and built-in sounds. This seems to be a well thought out product which kids should like.

The 1:144 Real Kit, however, has some shortcomings:
1. The kit is hard to distinguish from the toy. In fact, eBay listings for the two products are so similar that it’s hard to tell one from the other.
2. It is a snap together kit with a choice of stick-on markings or waterslide decals. These features indicate that the product is aimed at novice modellers.
3. Like the toy, the kit features a removable cockpit roof. This creates a huge gap at the bottom of the roof and ruins the scale look of the kit. Authenticity was obviously not a priority in the design of the kit.

Considering these compromises, it’s clear that Takara Tomy rejected the idea of a serious scale replica. Instead, the company attempted to create a product that would appeal to both children and adults. This was a mistake for two reasons.

First, the Real Kit is not sufficiently different from the toy in price or appearance. This may result in the two products cannibalizing each other’s sales.

Second, the Real Kit was designed under the assumption that most Thunderbirds Are Go viewers are kids. This fails to take adult viewers into account, who grew up with the original Thunderbirds series and are now enjoying the new reboot as a trip down memory lane. Many of these returning viewers are experienced modellers willing to pay top dollar for authentic kits of their favourite subjects. They have fond memories of the original Thunderbirds series and still admire all its wonderful hardware.

Takara Tomy would have been much wiser to follow the example of FineMolds, whose Star Wars kits set a new standard in quality for sci-fi subjects. Their enormously successful 1:72 Millennium Falcon which I discussed here is a case in point. The FineMolds Falcon was a rarity: a mass produced, high quality sci-fi kit aimed squarely at experienced modellers, with no compromises made to attract younger modellers.

In addition to compromising the quality of their kits, companies like Takara Tomy, Bandai and Aoshima also do a disservice to modellers by associating kits with toys. This tarnishes the image of scale modelling. Buying a kit from one of these companies is a bit like buying a stereo from a guy with a van parked in an alley.

But at the end of the day, having an average quality kit of the new Thunderbird 2 is better than nothing. Given the relatively low demand for sci-fi kits, we have to take what we can get. So if you decide to pick up Takara Tomy’s new Thunderbird 2, be prepared to do some extra work to get it up to standard. The basic shape of the kit looks accurate enough, and most of its shortcomings can be overcome with a little care. Just make sure to throw out the stickers. Or even better, mail them back to Takara Tomy with a note stating that scale modellers don’t use stickers!

-Ivar

Batmobile winterscape (1:35)

This diorama was inspired by the night scenes of the Batmobile stealing through snow-covered streets in Batman Returns (Tim Burton, 1989). I liked the contrast of the Batmobile against the fresh white snow.

I used Bandai’s Batmobile, a white metal Batman figure, a kitbashed Miniart Ruined Garage, and roof trusses from a gantry crane kit. Everything else was scratchbuilt.

-Ivar

Lag time (or, why it takes so long for some kits to be released)

The introduction of a new model kit based on a subject from a movie is an eagerly anticipated event for many hobbyists. I remember when MPC released its Millennium Falcon kit back in 1977, coinciding with the release of the first Star Wars movie. MPC’s marketing department was on the ball and capitalized on the movie’s success by being quick on the draw with the release of the kit.

Not all kit releases are timed as perfectly as MPC’s Falcon release. The same subject was released by FineMolds nearly three decades later, in 2005. The FineMolds Falcon, although late to the game, was a dramatic improvement over the MPC kit. It featured the usual high level of accuracy and detail associated with the FineMolds brand, in correct 1:72 scale. The MPC kit did not even specify a scale, and Star Wars aficionados have enjoyed debating the scale of the kit since it was released.

When I first heard about the FineMolds Falcon release, my first thought was, “Wow, it sure took them long enough.” But FineMolds actually did something very clever.

The price differential between the two kits is considerable, even with a few decades’ worth of inflation factored in. The result is that they are not in direct competition with one another. The MPC kit was clearly aimed at kids and teens with little or no money. The FineMolds kit, on the other hand, was targeted at advanced modellers with generous budgets. The funny thing is, even though the markets for the two kits are distinct, the person buying them could quite often be one and the same. If you were a teen when Star Wars was released, and bought the MPC kit back then, there’s a good chance that you’d be willing to upgrade to the FineMolds version several decades later. My guess is that this is exactly what FineMolds planned.

The FineMolds Falcon has been so successful that Revell is now re-releasing it under their Master Series label. It will still be manufactured in Japan by FineMolds but will have revised packaging and English instructions.

It’s less clear what Bandai was thinking with their recent release of 1:72 models of the classic X-Wing and Y-Wing. Chances are, anyone who wanted a 1:72 scale kit of either of these subjects would have picked up the FineMolds version by now. Price, accuracy and quality for both brands are similar. There just isn’t that much difference between them. Bandai will also be releasing a 1:144 Millennium Falcon, which has been done before by FineMolds as well. How Bandai will be able to turn a profit on these “me too” products is a mystery. A much better move would have been to produce a 1:48 Y-Wing to complement the FineMolds 1:48 X-Wing. This would have filled an empty niche in the market.

When Episode 7 of Star Wars comes out this December, a newly designed X-Wing will grace the screen. It looks good—smaller and sleeker—and can be glimpsed in the teaser trailer for the film. Fortunately, Bandai has made one good decision, which is to launch a kit of the new X-Wing just before Episode 7’s release in December. Unless the movie is a complete disaster, this kit will be a guaranteed cash cow. The new X-Wing will be followed by a kit of the new TIE Fighter, which looks like a lot like the classic TIE but with an inverted colour scheme. This kit should be popular as well.

-Ivar