Tag Archives: Brian Johnson

A deluxe diorama for Space: 1999 fans

Round 2 has released a 1:48 scale Nuclear Waste Area 2 Diorama Set which will delight fans of the 1970s TV show Space: 1999. Few sci-fi programs have generated such mixed feelings among viewers. On one hand, Brian Johnson’s special effects, taking direct inspiration from 2001: A Space Odyssey, were miles ahead of anything else on TV at the time. On the other hand, the stories lacked drama and failed to capture viewers’ attention, leading to the series being cancelled after two seasons.

Love it or hate it, Space: 1999 has stood the test of time. Its fan base is still going strong nearly half a century after the show’s cancellation. This has created demand for countless model kits and diecast replicas of the show’s wonderful hardware over the years. Which brings us to Round 2’s latest offering.

The Nuclear Waste Area 2 Diorama Set recalls “Breakaway,” the pilot episode of Space: 1999. In a last minute attempt to avert disaster, Eagle Transporters are dispatched to disperse nuclear waste canisters from the waste area before they can detonate. The attempt is unsuccessful and a massive explosion throws the moon out of earth’s orbit, setting the scene for two seasons of sci-fi adventures.

The kit includes the following:

  • 8x Lamp Posts with plug & play LED lights (requires 4 AA batteries – not included)
  • 2x Lamp Post Bases
  • 10x Figures in mix-and-match poses
  • 2x Moon buggies with cargo
  • 2x Nuclear Waste Control Cones
  • 2x Waste Containment Platforms
  • 8x Hexagonal Storage Boxes

These components can be used alone or in conjunction with Round 2’s 1:48 Eagle kit to create any number of scenes. All that’s missing is a lunar terrain base, which the resourceful diorama artist can tackle on his own. The really ambitious modeller could add a launch pad and crane to complete the scene. Round 2’s choice of 1:48 scale means that the diorama will have a very big footprint, especially if an Eagle is added.

The initial release of the kit also includes a 1:24 scale moon buggy. This is a curious addition given that it obviously won’t work in the same diorama as the other items. The upside is that the moon buggy could be a precursor to other 1:24 scale kits to come. The laser tanks from “The Infernal Machine” (Season 1, Episode 21) would be an excellent choice. Let’s keep our fingers crossed.

If you like to build dioramas and want to learn more about how to optimize the visual impact of your work, you might like my new book, Diorama Design. It’s available in both ebook and print formats at Amazon.

-Ivar

How many people build dioramas?

When assessing the popularity of an art form, we can consider the following:
· How many well-known artists are there
· How big a market is there for buyers and sellers
· How strong of an online presence is there (websites, discussion boards, etc.)
· How often is it in the news

It’s pretty obvious that based on these criteria, the popularity of dioramas is very limited. Most people who build dioramas usually start out as scale modellers, a niche group itself. This means that diorama artists are a niche of a niche!

If we look at a more commonly practised art form, like photography, most people with a passing interest in art would be able to name at least one famous photographer. Ditto for sculpture or painting. But what about dioramas? I’ve been building dioramas for many years, and the only diorama artist I can name off the bat is Sheperd Paine. And I know of him because of his book on dioramas, not his actual works.

But what about special effects technicians who work in film and television, you say? If you’re a science fiction aficionado, chances are you’ve heard of names like Douglas Trumbull, John Dykstra, Brian Johnson and Derek Meddings. Well, they’re all famous artists, but they create miniature sets, not dioramas. A miniature set is usually much larger than a diorama, because it’s optimized for filming. And because it’s specifically designed to be filmed, it only has to look good from the angle of the camera. A diorama, on the other hand, is open to scrutiny from many angles. Another differentiator is that miniature film sets can be digitally enhanced through computer generated effects in post-production, whereas dioramas don’t have this luxury.

Brian Johnson, who’s known for his superb work on Space: 1999, Alien, The Empire Strikes Back, and many other high profile projects, once remarked that he knew special effects supervisors who created works of art on their sets, but none of it showed up in the final shot. He added candidly, “with all that smoke swirling about the place, you can get away with murder!” His comment shows that unlike some other effects artists, he fully understood the difference between miniature sets and dioramas.

You might expect that artists who create dioramas for museums would be well known (and this would be a reasonable expectation). In a recent post, I discussed Museo de la Miniatura in Guayaquil, Ecuador. When I toured the museum, I asked several people for the name of the artist who created the dioramas. No-one was able to answer my question. Nor could I find the artist mentioned anywhere in the museum or on its website, despite the fact that every exhibit in the museum was created by this artist!

So it seems that museums don’t feel that the artists who created dioramas for them should receive credit or publicity for their work. And to make matters worse, diorama artists, unlike painters, don’t usually sign their name on their finished works. Diorama artists are the unsung (not to mention uncredited and unpublicized) artists of the art world.

The lack of well-known diorama artists is perhaps the greatest impediment to the popularity of the art, because artists benefit from other artists who inspire them. Photographers can aspire to the greatness achieved by Ansel Adams or Henri Cartier-Bresson. Painters, to Monet or Van Gogh. And sculptors, to Rodin or Michelangelo. But diorama artists have no such names to aspire to.

Perhaps because there are no well-known diorama artists, dioramas are rarely featured in art galleries. I’ve seen a few, but they tend to be few and far between.

Returning to the original question of how many people build dioramas, it’s clear that the numbers are extremely small. There are no famous diorama artists. Dioramas have a tiny web presence, are rarely bought, sold, or exhibited in galleries, and are hardly ever newsworthy.

Is this a problem? Not if you’re a sincere artist. By this I mean someone who does what they do because they love doing it, not because they want external validation. Popularity and recognition are nice, but they are chance by-products of the creative process and nothing more. The act of creating a work of art, with all its frustrations, joys, disappointments and successes, is what engages us first and foremost. We create art because we’re compelled to. So if you love building dioramas, that in itself is enough.

-Ivar

Eagle crash (1:87)

The iconic Eagle from Space: 1999 is one of my favourite spaceships, and Brian Johnson’s masterfully orchestrated crash sequences were the inspiration for this diorama.

The crashed Eagle is a modified MPC kit (rebuilt spine and passenger pod, drilled out and reshaped thrusters on command module, accurized main engines). The Lab Pod Eagle is a Warp resin kit (built out of the box). The Gunship Eagle is my own design, a kitbash using MPC Eagle parts, aftermarket resin missiles, landing gear from the MPC Darth Vader Tie Fighter kit, and various other pieces from the spares box.

The repainted HO scale figures from Preiser fit the MPC Eagle perfectly, suggesting that the kit’s true scale is closer to 1:87 than 1:72.

-Ivar