Tag Archives: Canada

The RBG Escarpment Train

The Royal Botanical Gardens (RBG) is a major tourist attraction in Burlington, Canada. As the name implies, the focus of RBG is horticulture. However, the site also features a G gauge (1:29 scale) model railroad layout, which was donated to RBG by Norman and Jackie Wells of Burlington in 2017. 

Known as the RBG Escarpment Train, the specs are impressive: nine diesel and two steam locomotives, 122 metres of track, and 476 figures on a 37 square metre layout. Although the sheer size of the layout commands attention, what really makes it memorable is the varied topography. There’s an intriguing mix of hills, valleys, tunnels and bridges, with lots of variation in height. Creating a continuous run track plan with this much of a vertical span is quite challenging, and the RBG Escarpment Train succeeds beautifully. 

Varying the topography accomplishes the same goal in both railroad layouts and dioramas. It creates visual interest. Multiple levels are always more interesting than one level. Unless you’re in the desert or in the middle of a lake, you generally see topography all around you. It’s part of nature, so employing it in a layout or diorama will also contribute to the realism of the scene you’re creating.   

The layout incorporates full lighting, allowing visitors to enjoy nighttime as well as daytime views of the exhibit. The nighttime version is especially striking.

The RBG Escarpment Train lives up to its name and is definitely worth a visit (more info at www.rbg.ca) next time you’re in Southern Ontario. Even if you’re not a gardener!

If you like to build dioramas and want to learn more about how to optimize the visual impact of your work, you might like my book, Diorama Design. It’s available in both ebook and print formats at Amazon.

-Ivar

Hudson’s Bay Christmas window displays – Part Three

In our third installment on The Bay’s festive window displays at its flagship store in Toronto, Canada, we have a thought provoking vignette of a white-bearded wizard gazing into his crystal ball. The ball is alive with constantly changing imagery of famous cities around the world. Positioned front and centre, this large transparent sphere is the focal point of the scene, symmetrically framed by a circular metal lattice which encompasses the entire display. Several smaller spheres containing various objects are also featured. There doesn’t seem to be any common theme to these objects. One sphere houses a steam locomotive, and another, a koala bear. They move up and down on cables, adding visual interest.

Of all the displays on show at Hudson’s Bay this Christmas, this one is the most ambiguous. It raises many questions and provides few answers. Based on the design of the lattice and the pedestal on which the globe sits, the scene apperas to be set sometime in the distant past, perhaps during the early days of the Industrial Revolution. But other than that, we know very little. Who is the mysterious wizard and what is he up to? The white beard suggests Santa Claus (minus his familiar red and white Christmas outfit), but he seems much too thin. And Santa is jovial, while this guy looks serious. If we overlook these inconsistencies, the other elements in the scene support the Santa Claus theory: the crystal ball could be a device for seeing who was naughty and who was nice this year. And the locomotive and koala bear could be toys destined for the children who were nice.

As with many works of art, there are several possible interpretations to this window display. Let your imagination fill in the answers.

If you like to build dioramas and want to learn more about how to optimize the visual impact of your work, you might like my new book, Diorama Design. It’s available in both ebook and print formats at Amazon.

Ivar

Hudson’s Bay Christmas window displays – Part Two

Last week we began taking a look at the festive window displays adorning the flagship Hudson’s Bay Company store in Toronto, Canada. Part Two of this series brings us to a display which animal lovers will enjoy: two polar bears raising their arms in a coordinated salute to the Christmas season.

The massive scale of the bears and the large arcs made by their moving arms makes them the focal point of the display. The bears are joined by a supporting cast of other animals indigenous to Canada, which are rendered in a much smaller scale. These include a killer whale, a penguin, walrus, and two narwhals. All the animals perform their own little dance in their transparent globes, all the while rotating on a large turntable.

The entire display is ensconsed in a frosty white frame which gives the impression of looking inside a cave carved out of solid ice. The crowning touch is a video backdrop which shows scenes of the Canadian arctic. Many dioramas have static backdrops (photos or paintings) but video trumps both. Moving pictures are always more eye catching than stills.

If you like to build dioramas and want to learn more about how to optimize the visual impact of your work, you might like my new book, Diorama Design. It’s available in both ebook and print formats at Amazon.

-Ivar