Tag Archives: diorama product

Interior diorama kit from Fresh Retro

Fresh Retro is releasing a 1:24 diorama kit which is the latest in their Scene In Box product line. It’s described as a fortress but looks more like a high tech factory or military base. 

With a footprint of 375x250mm and a height of 449mm, this kit will provide a sufficiently large backdrop for several 1:24 figures plus a vehicle or two. The scale is perfect for injection molded civilian vehicles, which are abundantly available in 1:24 and 1:25. It’s unclear if the kit can be assembled in multiple variations, but customizing it should be fairly straightforward either way. 

It’s evident that a great deal of design work went into the kit—in fact it could pass for a set from a sci-fi film. The walls are comprised of dark square panels combining a cross graphic with an industrial grid, and railings are rendered in contrasting blue. With three levels in total, there are numerous possibilities for telling the story of your choice. I discussed the benefits of creating topographical variety in Diorama Design

Kits like this are ideal for the diorama builder who doesn’t have the time or inclination to create a backdrop from scratch. The well thought out design makes this kit a great starting point for the artist who wants to concentrate on creating the figures that will populate the scene.  

This kit is one of a series that will be available from Hobbylink Japan in May.

-Ivar

Modular garage dioramas in 1:35

Part of the appeal of designing a diorama is the ability to arrange elements so they suit the scene you want to portray. This isn’t an issue if you’re building from scratch, but if you’re looking for a kit, most have a fixed layout which makes customization difficult. Enter Phoenix Model, who offer a modular garage diorama product line that provides design flexibility. 

These kits can be assembled in various combinations to create a single, double or triple wall diorama. The choice of 1:35 scale means that if your interests lean towards military subjects, you’ll have no shortage of vehicles and figures with which to populate the scene. Civilian vehicles will be more difficult to find; you may have to look for something in diecast in 1:32 scale.

Phoenix dioramas can be found at Amazon Japan and HobbyLink Japan

-Ivar  

Diminutive dioramas from Lost in Space

The TV series Lost In Space was a staple of 1960s sci-fi. Many of us grew up watching the adventures of the Robinson family on black and white television sets that buzzed and flickered when you turned them on. There was no remote control, just a couple of dials on the front of the set to select channels and adjust the volume. Sometimes you had to fiddle with the antenna (‘rabbit ears’) to get a good signal. 

Moebius Models offers two dioramas that capture the experience of what it was like watching Lost In Space half a century ago. One diorama features the Jupiter 2, that iconic UFO-inspired spacecraft which I covered in a previous post, and the other showcases their electronic helpmate, who was simply known as Robot. 

The dioramas won’t take up a lot of space, as each measures only about 10cm (4”) across. The old fashioned TV set has been cleverly repurposed to serve as a display cabinet for the subjects. On the front of each set is the cover of a TV Guide, the weekly magazine that contained the schedules of our favourite programs.

The dioramas were released as part of a 50th Anniversary Lost In Space commemorative offering. They’re available at monstersinmotion.com

-Ivar

Whimsical Titanic port scene diorama

Hong Kong based Suyata International Co. has created a unique, stylized diorama kit featuring the Titanic, which tragically sank on its maiden voyage in 1912. 

The scene depicts the Titanic leaving port, capturing the mirth and optimism of the occasion with a cute, cartoon-like depiction of the ship and harbour. The architecture of the port buildings takes inspiration from the Art Deco style, with strong geometric shapes rendered in soft pastel colours. Suyata is to be commended for breaking out of the straightjacket of realistic model kits. Their alternative interpretation of this famous subject is a positive step towards the acceptance of the diorama as an art form—an ongoing debate which I discussed in a previous post.

Suyata’s kit includes a waterline Titanic model measuring 15cm (6”) long along with port buildings and a somewhat incongruous steampunk style dirigible. The modeller will have to add their own sea surface to complete the diorama. 

-Ivar

Battle for the Reichstag diorama

Italeri recently announced a new 1:72 scale diorama kit depicting the momentous event in WWII when Soviet forces overran the Reichstag building in Berlin, Germany in the spring of 1945. The taking of this landmark building symbolized the defeat of Germany by Allied forces at the end of the war, as the building was the seat of the Reich parliament.

Italeri’s kit includes the building itself in laser cut MDF, along with decals, 32 German infantry figures, 32 Soviet infantry figures, a T-34/85 tank, and an 8.8cm Flak 37 with 7 crew figures. The generous supply of supporting accessories will allow the modeller to create a truly epic scene of this famous battle. 

Battle for the Reichstag is one of many historical diorama kits offered by Italeri in its Battle Sets product line. I covered their gladiatorial combat set in a previous post

The kit is due in the first quarter of 2021. 

-Ivar

Sea surface diorama base from Yamashita

Yamashita Hobby is a manufacturer of warship kits focusing on 1:700 Japanese WWII subjects. The company has just announced a new product for September 2020 release which will be of interest to naval modellers. 

The ‘3D Sea Surface Diorama Board’ is a ready-made one piece base designed to work with a 1:700 warship. The appeal of this product lies in the amount of time it can save the diorama artist in creating a realistic ocean surface for a naval diorama. 

The most popular technique for creating an ocean surface is with a solid, sculptable material which is built up on a flat support and then painted the appropriate shade of blue. The problem with this approach is that it fails to capture the translucent quality of water. 

The more ambitious modeller will use two-part casting resins to achieve a more realistic effect. Dye can be added to the resin to create a very nice translucent look. This approach is time consuming as it involves building up the surface gradually with multiple layers, as resin can crack if poured on too thick. I used several layers of resin to create the river surface for Drug Runners.

Yamashita’s new base will provide a realistic translucent ocean surface right out of the box, saving the modeller a ton of time in creating an attractive naval diorama. Details at HobbyLink Japan.

-Ivar