Tag Archives: Hudson’s Bay

Hudson’s Bay Christmas window displays – Part Five

Our final installment on The Bay’s festive window displays at their flagship store in Toronto, Canada brings us to an Alice In Wonderland inspired winter scene. The dominant figure is a large rabbit, joined by much smaller figures of children dressed in white. One of the children is perched like a jockey on the rabbit’s back, reins in hand. They are near the entrance to a magical tree which features a snow-covered staircase bathed in warm yellow light, beckoning visitors to enter.

This display features the same transparent spheres containing vignettes of various characters that can be seen in most of The Bay’s displays. In fact, all but one of the five displays (the first one we looked at) has these spheres. In this scene, the spheres are perched on branches like Christmas tree decorations.

Although there is less motion in this display than some of the others, the art department has compensated for this with an animated backdrop of falling snow. This lends some movement to the scene and blends nicely with the snow covered ground.

This display is even more obtuse than the last one we looked at, inviting speculation as to what exactly it’s all about. The staircase leading into the tree is especially effective in arousing our curiosity. We wonder what’s inside. Leaving things unexplained is a great way to heighten interest in a diorama; try it in your next project.

If you like to build dioramas and want to learn more about how to optimize the visual impact of your work, you might like my new book, Diorama Design. It’s available in both ebook and print formats at Amazon.

-Ivar

Hudson’s Bay Christmas window displays – Part Four

This week’s installment on The Bay’s festive window displays focuses on a circus ringmaster and his ensemble of performers. This display is notable for its palette of saturated reds. Red is an advancing colour, which means it appears to “pop” or advance towards us. Red is associated with excitement, romance, passion, and last but not least, Christmas. Gold is used as a supporting colour, embellishing the dominant red tones and giving the eye a bit of diversion.

The ringmaster is in the middle of his speech, announcing the next performance to eager spectators who are looking forward to another lavish spectacle. His right hand holds a bullhorn, and both hands are thrust upwards to grab the crowd’s attention.

Next to the ringmaster is a rotating platform with three Victorian era carriages pulled by a steam locomotive. Each carriage contains a diorama of circus performers within. On the central pedestal, several small transparent globes circle a larger globe, each containing additional vignettes of circus performers. So what we have is several small dioramas within a large one, making this a very unique display.

If you like to build dioramas and want to learn more about how to optimize the visual impact of your work, you might like my new book, Diorama Design. It’s available in both ebook and print formats at Amazon.

-Ivar

Hudson’s Bay Christmas window displays – Part Three

In our third installment on The Bay’s festive window displays at its flagship store in Toronto, Canada, we have a thought provoking vignette of a white-bearded wizard gazing into his crystal ball. The ball is alive with constantly changing imagery of famous cities around the world. Positioned front and centre, this large transparent sphere is the focal point of the scene, symmetrically framed by a circular metal lattice which encompasses the entire display. Several smaller spheres containing various objects are also featured. There doesn’t seem to be any common theme to these objects. One sphere houses a steam locomotive, and another, a koala bear. They move up and down on cables, adding visual interest.

Of all the displays on show at Hudson’s Bay this Christmas, this one is the most ambiguous. It raises many questions and provides few answers. Based on the design of the lattice and the pedestal on which the globe sits, the scene apperas to be set sometime in the distant past, perhaps during the early days of the Industrial Revolution. But other than that, we know very little. Who is the mysterious wizard and what is he up to? The white beard suggests Santa Claus (minus his familiar red and white Christmas outfit), but he seems much too thin. And Santa is jovial, while this guy looks serious. If we overlook these inconsistencies, the other elements in the scene support the Santa Claus theory: the crystal ball could be a device for seeing who was naughty and who was nice this year. And the locomotive and koala bear could be toys destined for the children who were nice.

As with many works of art, there are several possible interpretations to this window display. Let your imagination fill in the answers.

If you like to build dioramas and want to learn more about how to optimize the visual impact of your work, you might like my new book, Diorama Design. It’s available in both ebook and print formats at Amazon.

Ivar

Hudson’s Bay Christmas window displays – Part Two

Last week we began taking a look at the festive window displays adorning the flagship Hudson’s Bay Company store in Toronto, Canada. Part Two of this series brings us to a display which animal lovers will enjoy: two polar bears raising their arms in a coordinated salute to the Christmas season.

The massive scale of the bears and the large arcs made by their moving arms makes them the focal point of the display. The bears are joined by a supporting cast of other animals indigenous to Canada, which are rendered in a much smaller scale. These include a killer whale, a penguin, walrus, and two narwhals. All the animals perform their own little dance in their transparent globes, all the while rotating on a large turntable.

The entire display is ensconsed in a frosty white frame which gives the impression of looking inside a cave carved out of solid ice. The crowning touch is a video backdrop which shows scenes of the Canadian arctic. Many dioramas have static backdrops (photos or paintings) but video trumps both. Moving pictures are always more eye catching than stills.

If you like to build dioramas and want to learn more about how to optimize the visual impact of your work, you might like my new book, Diorama Design. It’s available in both ebook and print formats at Amazon.

-Ivar

Hudson’s Bay Christmas window displays – Part One

Canadian retailer Hudson’s Bay Company is one of the oldest department store chains in the world. Its origins date back to the early days of Canada, when explorers traded furs to earn their livelihood. While lesser department store names like Eatons and Sears have been torn apart by the whirlwind of change in the retail business, The Bay is still going strong.

The Hudson’s Bay flagship store on Queen St. in Toronto exemplifies the golden age of retail, when there was no Internet and department stores were the go-to destination for a family’s clothing and housewares needs. Like all proper department stores, this one features several large window displays at street level.

Window displays are the department store’s visual greeting to the prospective buyer. A well-done display not only shows the products being sold, but says something about the store and the type of shopping experience it offers. And naturally, this is all done with the bottom line in mind: a catchy display can turn a passing pedestrian into an impulse buyer.

On the cusp of the 2017 Holiday Season, Hudson’s Bay has reignited the glory of traditional retail with a stellar collection of window displays adorning its Toronto flagship store. As diorama artists, we know that window displays are simply large dioramas. The combination of professional talent and generous budgets behind these displays can yield spectacular results, and we can learn a great deal by studying them.

The first display we’re going to look at features three vintage style streetcars circling a stylized Toronto cityscape, complete with a Christmas tree, City Hall and skating rink. To give you an idea of the scale, the streetcars appear to be about O Gauge. They aren’t running on track, but glide elegantly along a loop circuit with no visible means of locomotion.

I’ve spoken before about how light and motion can be used to increase the impact of a diorama. This one checks both boxes. In terms of motion, we have not only running streetcars, but a rotating Christmas tree and animated skaters. Lighting is also used to good effect: the tree, skating rink and building windows are all illuminated. The near total absence of colour gives the display a distinctive look. A uniformly white palette creates a magical, wintery atmosphere and blends all the elements together into a visually cohesive whole.

If you like to build dioramas and want to learn more about how to optimize the visual impact of your work, you might like my new book, Diorama Design. It’s available in both ebook and print formats at Amazon.

-Ivar