Tag Archives: NMRA

Diorama Design at 2019 NMRA British Region Convention

I spoke to a small but enthusiastic audience of model railroaders at the NMRA (National Model Railroad Association) British Region Convention in Aberdeen, Scotland on September 28. The talk was titled ‘How to Maximize the Visual Impact of your Layout’ and was based on concepts discussed in my book, Diorama Design

I began the clinic by pointing out that dioramas and model railroads have a lot in common, as discussed previously on this blog. Making this point was a prerequisite for the success of the talk, and everyone seemed to acknowledge the similarities. It was interesting to see that most of the attendees described themselves as ‘artists’ rather than ‘engineers’ when it comes to model railroading. I went over the Design Process and the Seven Principles of Design, showing how these concepts can be applied to the world of model railroads. 

A good barometer of how well you connect with your audience is the number of questions you get at the end of the presentation. I fielded over twenty minutes of questions, which took us well past the end of the allotted timeslot. 

It’s always great to connect to an audience that’s sincerely interested in the subject matter, and with dioramas and train layouts being such close cousins, a connection was definitely made!

If you like to build dioramas and want to learn more about how to optimize the visual impact of your work, you might like my book, Diorama Design. It’s available in both ebook and print formats at Amazon.

-Ivar

Diorama Design presentation at Scotland NMRA Convention

I’ll be delivering a clinic at the NMRA Convention in Aberdeen, Scotland on September 28, 2019. It’s titled Maximize the Visual Impact of your Layout and will draw on concepts outlined in my book, Diorama Design (available in ebook and print formats at Amazon).

In case you’re not familiar with the National Model Railroad Association, it’s the largest organization devoted to the hobby and has a worldwide presence. The British Region of the NMRA is hosting the event, which takes place from the 27th to 29th of September.  

Whether you prefer to build model railroads or dioramas, the concepts I’ll be discussing apply equally. I discussed the similarities between the two hobbies in a previous post.

The convention is open to everyone from 10am to 4pm on Saturday the 28th, so you can attend on that day even if you’re not an NMRA member. The cost for non-members will be £5 at the door. 

The exact time of the clinic will be confirmed at a future date. Visit http://convention.nmrabr.org.uk/ for more information. Hope to see you there!

-Ivar


Diorama Design at RPM East 2019

Veteran model railroader Nicholas Kalis just delivered a presentation entitled Enhance Your Layout’s Story Telling – Practical Steps at RPM East 2019 in Greensburg, Pennsylvania, USA. A good part of the presentation was based on my book, Diorama Design

RPM stands for Railroad Prototype Modelers and is a major NMRA model railroading seminar. It includes presentations, operating sessions, open layouts, and a large model display room. The event took place on March 22nd and 23rd. 

Mr. Kalis spoke to a large room of model railroad aficionados about the visual elements of train layouts. For his presentation, he used many of the principles covered in Diorama Design, including:

  • Four Steps in Design
  • Design Basics – i.e. Geometry, Topography, Space and Color
  • Illustrated successful applications in model railroads of the Seven Principles of Design (Balance, Unity, Contrast, Emphasis, Movement, Repetition, and Rhythm)

He recollects the event as follows:

I drove through mostly virgin forests  – with my wife keeping me company – 3.5 hours each way to reach Greensburg, Pennsylvania to deliver my clinic. The audio-visual set-up was superb. The RPM folks even had one person assigned to introduce me. A second volunteer was on hand in each clinic room to insure that the audio-visual equipment worked properly. I found a friendly crowd of some 40 attendees seated to hear my presentation. During my presentation I found a receptive audience. Some even stood up to take photos of the slides projected on the screen. At the end of my presentation, four individuals approached me, in turn, to request a copy of my PowerPoint slides. One of the gentlemen handed me his business card which showed he had travelled all the way from Minnesota – quite a trip. He was a professional model railroad builder. One fellow was glad to finally meet me as many years ago Railroad Model Craftsman published my email in which I had defended this author (RMC had published an article he penned that described how to build accurate urban buildings – someone had written RMC to complain that such an article did not belong in a model railroad magazine.).

I’m delighted that Mr. Kalis was able to use the concepts in Diorama Design for his presentation, and that it went so well. Model railroads and dioramas are close cousins, and when thinking about the energy and creativity that goes into each of them, that well-known phrase ‘transferable skill set’ comes to mind. 

If you like to build dioramas or model railroads and want to learn more about how to optimize the visual impact of your work, check out Diorama Design. It’s available in both ebook and print formats at Amazon.

-Ivar

Review of Diorama Design

My book, Diorama Design, has just been reviewed in the Winter 2019 edition of The Potomac Flyer. This is a quarterly publication of the Potomac Division, NMRA (National Model Railroad Association). The review is by Nicholas Kalis, a veteran NMRA model railroader and author who has written many articles devoted to the hobby. 

Mr. Kalis does a great job in his review of discussing how the principles in Diorama Design apply not only to dioramas, but to model railroads as well. After all, a scenic model railroad can be thought of as a diorama enlivened by the motion of miniature trains. I wrote about this in a previous post.  

Unlike two-dimensional art forms like painting and photography, dioramas and model railroads share a sculptural aspect and a reach-out-and-touch-it physical presence. They also utilize similar construction techniques and materials. Above all, modelers in both camps share a common interest in creating visually compelling miniature environments.

Based on these similarities, Mr. Kalis makes a strong case that model railroad aficionados can benefit from the concepts outlined in Diorama Design. So if you’re a model railroader looking to add some visual punch to your layout, you may want to check out the book. It’s available in both ebook and print formats at Amazon. 

Thanks to Mr. Kalis for sharing his insights from the world of model railroads, and for taking the initiative to write the review. You can read it here

-Ivar